Furniture faux pas

There are moments, like yesterday, when I think, “that’s not the best thing to put on Twitter”. And I fully admit we all have moments where we tweet things that maybe we shouldn’t, I am not immune by a long shot. But when a company’s official press account tweets something like the screen cap below, you know someone needs a lesson in thinking before tweeting…

ikea habitat tweet

Oh Ikea, I am a big fan. I like the clean lines of your Scandinavian inspired furniture and the convenience of being able to actually buy something the day I want it rather than having to wait 6-8 weeks for delivery. But this tweet? To quote one of my favourite films: Big mistake. Big.

Also, considering that this is from your press office, people who it has to be said are meant to know better, it does indicate that you either need a new press team or someone needs their butt kicked.

As for Habitat, well the big question is how they will respond. Will they sink to the depths that Ikea are plumbing or will they take the high road and ignore it? Only time will tell.

What do you think of this tweet? Would it put you off shopping at Ikea knowing they are using such dirty tricks as this? And if you have any Habitat shopping to do, it sounds like tomorrow might be a good day to do it!

Average Josephine x

PS. Brownie points to whoever can name the film the quote comes from! Although it’s pretty easy…

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Too big for her boots?

When I saw a blogger posting an FYI for PRs on Twitter stating that she didn’t run news stories on launches etc so whilst press releases were fine but e-mails asking for coverage were not, I stopped to think for a minute. I could understand her point but her tone was not pleasant.

Considering this is one of the most well known of Britain’s fashion bloggers (I’m not going to name names but it would probably be relatively easy to work it out), I was stunned at the lack of tact and media savvy that this tweet displayed. Granted the blogger in question probably didn’t think about the tone she was employing whilst trying to shoehorn her thoughts into 140 characters but it came across as being a bit snotty and rather arrogant.

So the question it raises is “does the familiarity that Twitter brings lead us to say things without thinking”?

I am not going to say that I have never ever tweeted something without thinking or that something I’ve said could be misconstrued a being offensive. I have tweeted people to say that comments they have made are rather offensive when they have been joking about mental illness (not a laughing matter in my book) and that they shouldn’t be advocating people stopping taking medication as what has worked for them may not work for everyone.

But for me, Twitter is very much part of my social life, I do not get any of my work through it and I am followed by only three or four work colleagues (to my knowledge). I don’t discuss my job as much as possible as I do think there are some things best left out of the public domain. But for a blogger, whose full time job is blogging, to openly berate PRs, who are probably a significant source of information for them and without whom their job would be significantly more difficult, for requesting coverage on a new product launch smacks of someone who has grown a little too big for her boots.

I can understand that someone in her position probably receives hundreds, possibly even thousands of e-mails a day and so extra is probably a pain in the neck but there are ways and means of addressing the problem. On a public forum such as Twitter is not the way to do it in my opinion. These PRs are doing a job and part of that is sending e-mails to people they think are influential and who might be able to give them some coverage. And whilst I might have mis-read the tone of her tweet, if I have then likely as not someone else will have done as well. And to annoy one PR person is to potentially lose out on an opportunity, no matter how big or successful you are.

Do you think that such a request, if you can call it that, should have been issued on Twitter? Or do you think that a little more discretion could have been used?

Average Josephine x

Forgiven and forgotten?

When Sam Baker, the editor of Red Magazine, retweeted a Huffington Post article on Friday, I could have thrown something. Considering I was holding my phone and a cup of tea, neither would have ended well.  It took me a while to be able to write a rational post about it or I would have had this up sooner.  I wasn’t upset at the retweet but the subject of the article: Rihanna and her reported decision to feature Chris Brown in a remix of her upccoming single, “Birthday Cake”, after she invited him to her birthday party and he asked all the guests to sign confidentiality waivers.

There are so many things wrong with this situation that I almost don’t know where to start. This is the Chris Brown that she pressed charges against for an assault that left her battered and bruised. If anyone thinks that it wasn’t that serious then please read this police report and see whether you think it’s serious enough to warrant prosecution.

Many people have said that Brown should be forgiven for his actions and allowed to live his life as he wishes and that if Rihanna has forgiven him then why can’t the rest of the world? But it isn’t that simple, for so many reasons.

If Brown had been truly remorseful then that would be one thing although I don’t think anyone should have been having perform at a major music event (yes, Grammys, I would be referring to you) until he had fulfilled the terms of his sentence and his probation was completed in August 2014. He still has a long way to go. But when you consider that he doesn’t appear to have changed, why should he be forgiven? To be forgiven in my world, you need to have shown true remorse, to have changed the things that caused you to react that way in the first place. Brown doesn’t appear to have changed at all. When asked on “Good Morning, America” about the incident with Rihanna he commented that it wasn’t really a big deal anymore but followed it up by smashing the window of his dressing room and storming, shirtless, out of the building. When some singers and actors tweeted their distaste that Brown had been asked to perform at the Grammys, Brown retaliated by tweeting “HATE ALL U WANT BECUZ I GOT A GRAMMY Now! That’s the ultimate FUCK OFF!“. Whilst the tweet was later deleted (I suspect his management threw a tantrum about his image or similar) it does demonstrate that this is still a highly volatile individual.

Chris Brown tweet Grammy win

Chris Brown's 'celebratory' tweet after his Grammy win

As for Rihanna, I am worried about the effect of her actions. One of the problems with domestic violence is that as well as being physically damaging, the abuser often emotionally abuses their partner to the extent that they believe that they are completely unloveable and no-one other than this person who beats them could ever love them. Rihanna, as much as she may not want to be, has become an example to women of how to deal with a man who beats them. She went straight to the police and pressed charges even though that meant this highly personal and probably highly embarassing incident being dragged into the spotlight. She did the thing that so many women cannot do: she left.

So for her to go back, to allow someone who did this to her back into her life, Rihanna is sending out the wrong message: that it is safe to let these men back into your life. For so many women, it turns out to be the last thing they do.

I understand that one incident, even one so appalling as what Chris Brown put Rihanna through cannot necessarily destroy the love between two people. I understand that she may have forgiven him and considering they work in the same industry, it must be nigh on impossible for her to avoid him. But no matter how much she may love him or want to forgive him, she owes it to herself, and every other woman in the same position, to stay away.

Could you ever forgive a man who beat you up how Chris Brown did? And do you think he deserves forgiveness?

Average Josephine x